Chasing The Honorary Super Slam: Fishing Los Cabos

Have you ever dreamed of completing one of the many slams the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) recognizes? In the fishing industry, this is one of the highest recognized “trophies” of the sport. There are few things more challenging than completing one of the many slams the IGFA recognizes, from an angler’s perspective.

“Slams are so prestigious because they require the angler to catch a collection of some of the most elite and elusive game fish … requiring an enormous amount of angling skill and determination, great chemistry with captain and crew, patience with Mother Nature, hungry fish and a little luck!” states Rob Kramer, president of the IGFA in an article written for Marlin Magazine. (Source: http://www.marlinmag.com/royal-billfish-slam-fishing-world-record)

Are you aware of the difference between a slam and a world record? There are differences and rules that must be followed to be recognized as a slam holder. Slams must be weighed onboard and are highly recommended by the IGFA to be released, whereas world records must be weighed on land and kept by the IGFA. One big difference is that a slam can never be beaten, the title holder has that recognition for life, whereas a world record can be beaten.

If you find the title of being a Slam holder appealing, you are not alone. There are many anglers out there chasing the goal, first being recorded in 1992 and growing in popularity since. The record holder for the most Grand Slams is 17, held by Gabrielle Knapp of Stuart, Florida.

On board the Chupacabra off the shores of Los Cabos, Captain Clay Hensley and team has assisted anglers in catching a Grand Slam, reeling in a blue, black and stripe marlin all in the same day. Captain Clay Hensley, as an angler, has personally caught a Triple Slam twice and a Double Super Slam (2 sailfish, 2 white marlins, 2 blue marlin and 2 swordfish in one day) off the shores of Venezuela. First mate of the Chupacabra, Jason Douglas, as an angler, has caught an elusive fantasy slam as well. The experience of these two as anglers is reflected in their knowledge on board.

Below is a list and definition of the different Grand and Super Grand Slams recognized by the International Game Fish Association (IGFA). In green are all the species that are found off the shores of Baja California Sur in the Sea Of Cortez or the Pacific Ocean. 

Defining the 10 BLUE-WATER GRAND SLAMS:

For a grand slam, three *3 species from that club’s list of recognized game fish must be caught (by the angler) on the same day; to nail a super grand slam, four *4 species are required.

**Offshore Grand Slam 3* and Super Grand Slam 4*
**Eligible species:
blue marlin, black marlin, striped marlin, white marlin, sailfish, swordfish, and spearfish

Only 15 anglers have qualified for the super grand so far.

**Atlantic Offshore Grand Slam 3* and Super Grand Slam *4
**Eligible species: tunas – bluefin,
yellowfin, bigeye – and mako shark, with the provision that one billfish may be substituted for any one species.

Only 4 anglers have qualified for Grand Slam and the Super Grand Slam Club has no members, offering serious exclusivity.

**Mediterranean Grand Slam *3 and Super Grand Slam *4
**Eligible species: swordfish, spearfish, albacore and bluefin tuna. 

No angler has yet qualified for the Mediterranean Grand Slam and 1 angler has the honor of the Med Super Grand Slam Club.

**Pacific Offshore Grand Slam *3 and Super Grand Slam *4
**Eligible species: bluefin,
yellowfin and bigeye tuna, and any billfish.

4 anglers have the Pacific Grand Slam and none for the Pacific Offshore Super Grand Club.

**Tuna Grand Slam *3 and Super Grand Slam *4
**Eligible species:
yellowfin, bluefin, bigeye, and albacore. 

1 angler claims the Tuna Super Grand Slam and none for the Grand Slam

Defining the 3 BLUE-WATER ROYAL SLAMS:

Royal slams require an angler to catch all listed species, though he/she has a lifetime (not just one day) to do so. It’s taken much of a lifetime for many royal slam club members to realize that goal. Catches can be recognized retroactively so they can come over decades in multiple locations, multiple boats, crews, and captains. The three royal slam clubs are based on types of fish:

**Billfish Royal Slam
**Nine required species:
Pacific sailfish, Atlantic sailfish, Pacific blue marlin, Atlantic blue marlin, black marlin, striped marlin, white marlin, swordfish and spearfish.

A total of 89 registered anglers have at this time earned the honor. Some have done so multiple times.

**Tuna Royal Slam
**Eight required species: Atlantic or Pacific bigeye, blackfin, bluefin, dogtooth, longtail,
skipjack, southern bluefin and yellowfin

Only 3 registered anglers make up the Tuna Royal Slam Club.

**Shark Royal Slam
**Nine required species: blue,
hammerhead, mako, thresher, tiger, white, tope, whaler and porbeagle. 

There are 4 registered anglers that currently qualify as members.

If you would like more information about the species of the Grand, Super Grand or Fantasy Slams that are available in the Los Cabos area please contact Captain Clay Hensley of the Chupacabra to book your charter in the Quest to gain the honor if becoming a Slam title holder. Contact by telephone at +1 928 444-2066 (USA) or +52 624 108-4506 (MX) or by email at chupacabrasportfishing@gmail.com. 

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